The history of the tracing of Sedgwick Genealogy among the descendants of Samuel Sedgwick (1667) starts with one George Sedgwick (41414), a lawyer in Chicago. After the death of his father in 1851 his father's pastor asked him for some information about his father's life and children. While gathering this data he became interested in the family history and started compiling data. He died in 1877, but before he did he wrote a 300 page book, which he saved from the great Chicago fire by taking it in a boat onto Lake Michigan. This book was in 1934 in the possession of Mr. Earl Phillips Sedgwick (41C1C1) of North Chicago. Perhaps someday we will be able to locate this book and copy it to Sedgwick.org.

George's nephew Frederick James Sedgwick (414181) became interested in the genealogy work and spent much of his life doing the research. There is on microfilm at the California State Library - Sutro (on the campus of San Francisco State University) a copy of a 21 page typewritten manuscript.

A Henry Dwight Sedgwick of Stockbridge MA, probably Henry Dwight II (B47,4), worked with George and Frederick. He must be the Henry Dwight Sedgwick who wrote the pamphlet "Robert Sedgwick A Sketch" (see the "Books" section. He was apparently active in data gathering, but wrote no genealogy.

In 1905 Hubert Merrill Sedgwick (411,324,1), apparently working independently of the others, published the pamphlet on the descendants of Deacon Gordon Sedgwick (411).

When Frederick J Sedgwick died in 1929 he willed his data collection to Hubert Merrill Sedgwick.

Francis Morris Sedgwick (21B4211) of Columbus Ohio did a lot of research and in 1934 wrote the manuscript "A Genealogy of the Sedgwick Family in America since 1635", which was the broadest and most nearly complete record to its time of the descendants of Samuel Sedgwick and Mary Hopkins.

From about 1932 Hubert and Francis worked together by mail, passing documents back and forth, so that both had the information, but apparently each maintaining posession of their documents.

After the death of Francis in 1939, Hubert worked vainly to fill in the blanks in the records and to prepare a manuscript for publication. Hubert concluded that the work was too large for one volume and would take several volumes to publish. He had decided to publish first the volume on the descendants of Benjamin, because that branch of the family had subscribed to the most copies. He had that one ready or about ready to print when he died in 1950.

About the time of his death, the records that Hubert M. Sedgwick held, including those of Frederick J Sedgwick, were deposited in the library of the New Haven Colony Historical Society. They hold these records to this date. The Sedgwick Collection (MSS B46) contains approximately 12,650 items in nineteen boxes containing four to twenty-one folders each.

The collection contains a wealth of information. It includes all of Frederick's data and records. It contains all that Hubert and Francis had compiled together, and all that Hubert had done after the death of Francis. Since Hubert and Francis had worked so closely for several years before Francis' death, and since Francis had accessed George's book, the collection probably contains all the data the George and Francis had compiled, but it does not include their source documents. Perhaps we will be able to contact Francis's descendants and obtain his records. Perhaps we will be able to locate George's book in possession of one of Earl Phillip Sedgwick's descendants.

Much of the information has never been published. Beyond the 1934 Manuscript, only the book of Benjamin's descendants has been published. The remainder is there waiting to be processed. The Society is formulating a plan that may include micro-filming the entire collection.

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